Luther Visualized 1 – Birthplace

Baptismal Font of the Church Sts. Peter and Paul, Eisleben (© Red Brick Parsonage, 2018). The upper stone bowl of this font contains the only remains of the font at which Martin Luther was baptized by Pastor Bartholomaeus Rennebecher in this same church on the day after he was born.

Introduction

“Luther Visualized” is a new series of short posts I am starting, to commemorate the forthcoming 500th anniversary of the Lutheran Reformation on October 31, 2017. I borrowed the idea from the service folder covers I have been designing to accompany a 17-sermon series that follows Luther’s life and uses it to teach biblical doctrine. I will be showcasing all of the photographs and artwork I used for these service folder covers, but this medium will allow me to showcase other related works of art too, if I desire (as I do in this post). I will also be including a few additional posts to showcase other interesting works of art besides the ones I used for the service folder covers.

Luther’s Birthplace

Luther’s Birth House Museum in Eisleben (© Red Brick Parsonage, 2018).

It was at this location in the village of Eisleben that Martin Luther was born into the world after 11 p.m. on November 10, 1483 (possibly 1482). He was baptized the following day at the Church of Sts. Peter and Paul, one block to the south. After a city fire destroyed Luther’s original birthhouse in 1689, the city purchased the property and erected the building pictured to serve simultaneously as a school for the poor and a Luther memorial.

Sources
Martin Luthers Geburtshaus in Lutherstadt Eisleben,” (Tourist-Information Lutherstadt Eisleben & Stadt Mansfeld e.V.), accessed 14 August 2017

Philipp Melanchthon’s preface to Tomus Secundus Omnium Operum Reverendi Domini Martini Lutheri, Doctoris Theologiae, etc. (Wittenberg: Hans Lufft, 1546), par. 4

Matthäus Merian der Ältere, Eißleben, copperplate engraving, 1650

This engraving of Eisleben appeared in Martin Zeiler’s famous Topographia Germaniae series, specifically Topographia Superioris Thüringiae, Misniae, Lusatiae etc (Frankfurt am Main: Matthaeus Merian, 1650), between pages 72 and 73. The city is viewed from the east, with St. Gertrud in the foreground (east), outside the moat; St. Nicolai prominent on the right (north); St. Andreas with its twin spires on the far side (west), where Luther preached his final four sermons; and St. Petri-Pauli, where Luther was baptized, on the left (south). The mill is pictured on hill in the distance. Another source dates the engraving to 1647, and says that it depicts the city before the town fire of 1601.

About redbrickparsonage
Red Brick Parsonage is operated by a confessional Lutheran pastor serving in the South of the U.S.A.

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